The Lead

Foreign Policy magazine placed the climate scientist and evangelical Christian on its “100 Leading Global Thinkers” roster for 2014. In April, Time listed her as one of the year’s “100 most influential people” in the world.

Feature Stories
ELECTION ANALYSIS: LOCAL VOTES
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The ballot measure’s outcome in the North Texas city was closely watched – in Texas and beyond – for its possible influence in other local fights over the drilling method and significance for the broader climate issue.

TCN INTERVIEW
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The People’s Climate March in September was billed as “the largest climate march in history.” An estimated 400,000 marched in New York, plus tens of thousands in more than 2,800 events in 166 countries.

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The federal agency got “almost everything it wanted,” Justice Antonin Scalia said of a 7-2 ruling that upheld a key part of the Obama administration’s regulations to cut industrial emissions of climate-altering pollution.

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Longtime, mostly urban, environmental advocates traded policy ideas recently with property-rights activists from rural areas. Will the fledgling alliance have staying power? San Antonio writer Greg Harman reports.

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The report “highlights how climate change is expected to interact with, and in many cases exacerbate, problems we already struggle with today in Texas,” Texas Tech scientist Katharine Hayhoe told TCN.

TCN Journal
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Each age group favored policies to cut climate-disrupting pollution more than the next-oldest group in the latest edition of the national poll by the business school at the University of Texas

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Climate Central’s interactive map portrayed Texas and other cities’ projected summer highs. The World Meteorological Organization, meanwhile, urged water planners and others to consider hotter conditions occurring now. [With interactive graphic.]

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A federal appeals court reversed a ruling, sought by a conservation coalition, which temporarily halted new water-use permits in river systems feeding the endangered species’ winter habitat on the Texas coast.

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Gov. Rick Perry said the new regulations were meant to “appease” only “a tiny sliver of environmental extremists.” Opinion surveys found about two-thirds of all Americans back the climate-protection initiative, however.

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Energy and economic experts said the EPA’s new rules for existing power plants can be a net economic benefit for the state, especially by boosting its natural gas, wind and solar industries to replace coal burning.

Featured Reports

Researchers find world’s wetlands play key role as carbon sinks
Scientists in California have identified wetlands drained for development and agriculture as sources of CO2 released to the atmosphere.
[ Climate News Network ]
full story »

Acidic seas block fishes’ survival mechanism
Studies show the sense of smell, vital for survival of marine predators and prey, is being impaired as carbon dioxide acidifies oceans.
[ Climate News Network ]
full story »

Dietary effect on greenhouse-gas emissions is hard to swallow
New research findings say federal guidelines on a better diet might be good for people’s health, but not healthy for the climate.
[ Climate News Network ]
full story »

Other Reports