The Lead

Climate Central’s interactive map portrayed Texas and other cities’ projected summer highs. The World Meteorological Organization, meanwhile, urged water planners and others to consider hotter conditions occurring now. [With interactive graphic.]

Feature Stories
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The federal agency got “almost everything it wanted,” Justice Antonin Scalia said of a 7-2 ruling that upheld a key part of the Obama administration’s regulations to cut industrial emissions of climate-altering pollution.

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Longtime, mostly urban, environmental advocates traded policy ideas recently with property-rights activists from rural areas. Will the fledgling alliance have staying power? San Antonio writer Greg Harman reports.

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The report “highlights how climate change is expected to interact with, and in many cases exacerbate, problems we already struggle with today in Texas,” Texas Tech scientist Katharine Hayhoe told TCN.

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A U.N.-sponsored panel, comprising researchers from 39 countries, said scientists are now 95 percent certain that humans are the main cause of global warming. TCN asked Texas climate experts for their reactions to the report.

TCN INTERVIEW
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The aim of the conference, planned in response to a class assignment at UT’s LBJ School, was to identify “collaborative solutions” to help make the Austin region more resilient to the impacts of climate change.

TCN Journal
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A federal appeals court reversed a ruling, sought by a conservation coalition, which temporarily halted new water-use permits in river systems feeding the endangered species’ winter habitat on the Texas coast.

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Gov. Rick Perry said the new regulations were meant to “appease” only “a tiny sliver of environmental extremists.” Opinion surveys found about two-thirds of all Americans back the climate-protection initiative, however.

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Energy and economic experts said the EPA’s new rules for existing power plants can be a net economic benefit for the state, especially by boosting its natural gas, wind and solar industries to replace coal burning.

SNAPSHOTS OF THE DROUGHT
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“We have to adapt because the climate is changing,” California Gov. Jerry Brown declared. There’s been no such talk from Texas’ top officials, of course, but drought adaptation is getting serious consideration all the same.

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“The facts are, our area is warmer, and the facts are, there’s no indication at this point that it’s going to cool down,” researcher B.A. “Bob” Stewart, an agriculture expert with nearly half a century of professional experience in the region, told TCN.

Featured Reports

Toledo’s toxic algae bloom in line with climate projections
Climate change is expected to increase heavy precipitation near Lake Erie. More rainfall means more nutrients in runoff, which means more toxicity from algae, a Great Lakes researcher said.
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Warming threatens to cut crop yields, researchers find
A new study found the hard-to-predict risk of food production being unable to meet a growing population’s needs jumps with climate change factored in.
[ Climate News Network ]
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Report paints bleak future for nuclear power
Globally, the nuclear power industry is aging, plagued with high costs and construction delays, and generally declining, an annual assessment concluded.
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